Indaus

Thursday, February 17, 2005

Criticisms for the Beloved Parivar

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Now dont get me wrong, i consider myself a committed long distance armchair supporter of the Sangh Parivar. I have much sympathy and admiration for them and their cause of Hindutva.
But i must say that much of of my worldview and opinions has been shaped not as much by the right wing, but rather infact more by reading and seeing the utter failure and hypocrisy of the leftist pseudo-secular "intelligensia" of India, who not satisfied with doing their best to run India into the ground over the last fifty years, take great pride at every turn in continually denigrating our ancient religion and culture.

While i support the Sangh and always will in what ever way possible, i still disagree with them on a number of important issues.
As i have a pathological hatred for Indian marxists and their ideology, it pains me particularly that the RSS still champions the policy of Swadeshi (self-sufficiency). Thus in India we have the absurd situation that both the right wing and the extreme left share the same economic viewpoint.
The RSS should shed such outdated ideas and embrace free market economics much like the American right wing has done. This position on economics also conflicts with the BJP, the political wing of the RSS. The BJP came to power in the 90's with one of its main support planks being middle classes and merchant castes. Overseas Indians in America and the west who are overwhelmingly strong supporters of the Sangh and provide large financial donations also would like to see a change in their stance, after all they left India precisly because of swadeshi.

The second issue i have with them is their conservative views on Indian culture. While i certainly believe that many of their views are legitimate concerns that i also share, i feel sometimes groups especially like the Shiv Sena and VHP are often too crude and often take umbrage at trivial things like their campaign against Valentines day, etc, when there are far bigger fish to fry. This only achieves in enabling their enemies to easily paint unflattering images of them, therefore belittling both the Sangh and all their other activities.
I believe it was Mahatma Gandhi who once said: "We will let the winds of all lands blow through our door, but we will be swept away by none".
One therefore should not be fearful of today's globalised world for i believe that most Indians are smart enough to automatically take what is good and largely reject what is not. For those that dont? Well we can always ostracize them as outcastes as is our time honoured tradition, lol.

Ironically what most Indians especially the Sangh dont recognise is that India's conservative cultural ethos is in a great part due to the influence of Islam as well as the victorian era hypocrisy of the British.
It wasnt always like this, at one time Indian attitudes to things such as sex must also have been somewhat liberal and permissive. It was during the Gupta dynasty "The Golden Age of Hinduism" that works like the Kamasutra's were composed. It was in the 10th century just prior to Islamic rule over Northern India that the great temples of Khajuraho were built with their explicit erotic sculptures.

If the muslims had found them they almost certainly would have been smashed them to bits like they did to every other major temple complex in Northern India. When the British first saw them they also though of them as extremely vulgar.
Today the values they once represented are frowned upon by most Indians. Today things such as pornography and homosexuality (given our talent for procreation, we could use a few homo's) are illegal and a punishable crimes in India, when once over a thousand years ago they were apparently accepted and depicted. It is truely incredible how times change.

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